Be Organized with Square Foot Gardening

Would you like your garden crops to be planted in a very organized fashion?

square foot gardening

Square foot gardening is a particular form of gardening where the gardener plants in small square areas adjacent to one another instead of rows. This method keeps your vegetables and herbs very organized and separate from one another. Most square foot gardens are of the raised type and are used where planting space is limited, making each inch of space productive.

Vegetables and herbs are the usual crops grown in square foot gardens. Seeds are planted in the soil one-by-one instead of being scattered in rows. When a crop is harvested in one section of the garden, a small amount of compost is added to the harvested area, and new seeds are planted there to produce the next crop during the same season. Advantages of using the square foot gardening method include; less use of space, less watering, no fertilizers or pesticides, no thinning of crops, very little weeding and repeat growth.

Square foot gardening was developed by Mel Bartholemew, who wrote a best-selling gardening book on the subject. PBS TV filmed a series about his square foot gardening method which made this particular way of gardening very popular. Bartholemew founded the Square Foot Gardening Foundation (SFGF) as a humanitarian effort to end world hunger. SFGF teachers are bringing this way of gardening to low-income people all over the world, to community centers, churches, state prisons, and to people with disabilities. Learn more about Square Foot Gardening at http://www.squarefootgardening.com/.

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